Sample reflective essays reading

By not going forward to explore new regions, or break up new grounds, we are thrown back more and more upon our past acquisitions; and this habitual recurrence increases the facility and indifference with which we make the imaginary transition. This is true, but the difficulty is to see what is before you. Astolpho’s voyage to the moon in Ariosto, they criticize sharply as a quaint and ridiculous burlesque: but if any one had the face seriously to undertake such a thing, they would immediately patronize it, and defy any one to prove by a logical dilemma that the attempt was physically impossible. It means, first of all, the growing differentiation of the child’s experience, that is, of his perceptions and ideas, as well as the expansion of his reflective processes. Hill called forth when he made his fingers run up the arm of his infant, is surely suggestive of a vestigial reflex handed down from ages of parasitic pestering.[115] With regard to the laughing reaction, which, as we have seen, he considers to involve a distinct mode of stimulation, he suggests that it is an inherited form of that common mode of play among young animals, which consists in an exchange of good-natured and make-believe attacks and defences, or a sort of game of sham-fight. IV.–OF THE MANNER IN WHICH DIFFERENT AUTHORS HAVE TREATED OF THE PRACTICAL RULES OF MORALITY. The establishment of more or less personal relations of confidence between library assistant and reader takes longer and is less complete when the sole intermediary is written language. The manner of doing this explained, and its beneficial influence stated Illustrated by an interesting case of recovery, No. This principle is of a most universal application. As the moon travels, this vast body of waters rears upward, as if to watch its motions, and pursues the same constant rotation. That is, upon whatever subject they exercise their attention, they show the same turn of mind or predominating faculty. Their taste keeps pace with their capacity; and they are not deterred by insurmountable difficulties, of which they have no idea. Habit is by it’s nature to a certain degree arbitrary, and variable, the original disposition of the mind, it’s tendency to acquire or persevere in this or that habit is alone fixed and invariable.[75] As however the force of previous habit is and always must be on the side of selfish feelings, it is some consolation to think that the force of the habit we may oppose to this is seconded by reason, and the natural disposition of the mind, and that we are not obliged at last to establish generosity and virtue ‘lean pensioners’ on self-interest.[76] I have thus far attempted to shew by a logical deduction that the human mind is naturally disinterested: I shall at present try to shew the same thing somewhat differently, and more in detail. This would lead almost inevitably to his acquittal, as forcibly pointed out by Hincmar in the ninth century. What movements of intelligence are observable are pretty plainly of an intelligence subjugated by the dominant passion, and made to work for it by foraging far and wide for food-stuffs to satisfy its appetite for provocatives and solaces. What are called the personal pronouns, it may be observed, are among the last words of which children learn to make use. Every body is eager to look at him, and to conceive, at least by sympathy, that joy and exultation with which his circumstances naturally inspire him. Pain is a bitter-sweet, which never surfeits. Take, for instance, the work of reference, the cyclopedia, we will say. Libraries gave no attention to children. There seems no _natural_ correspondence between objects and feelings, between things and words. The fact, as stated in itself, is an anomaly: as thus explained, by sample reflective essays reading combining it with a general state of feeling in a country, it seems to point out a great principle in society. You can hardly make the word agreeable to English ears without this comfortable reference to the reassuring science of arch?ology. We read in a recent magazine article of the trials of Mrs. It will be a good exercise for their ingenuity, if not for their ingenuousness. The feeling of weakness and incapacity would have made his hand soon falter, would have rebutted him from his object; or had the canvas mocked, and been insensible to his toil, instead of gradually turning to ‘A lucid mirror, in which nature saw All her reflected features,’ he would, like so many others, have thrown down his pencil in despair, or proceeded reluctantly, without spirit and without success. Thick lips and a flat nose are a beauty. It seems always to be of a mixed feeling-tone: some sensational elements being pleasant, others unpleasant, though analysis may be unable to attribute with exactness their respective tones to the several elements. Indeed he considers their suffrages in this respect as a sort of impertinence at best, as implying some doubt upon the subject: and as to their direct censures, he will always find some feelings, or motives in his own mind, or some circumstances with which they are not acquainted, which will in his opinion make a total difference in the case. Such complaints, however, may often give the librarian a hint. We can scarce avoid looking upon him with chagrin and uneasiness; and the rude and brutal are apt to vent upon him that spleen which his intelligence gives occasion to. (11) Don’t buy costly “new editions” of reference books without assuring yourself that the newness is more than nominal. It would pursue, naturally and of its own accord, the direct or progressive movement of the Sphere, but is every now and then shocked, if one may say so, and turned violently out of its natural career by the retrograde and stationary appearances of the Planet, betwixt which and its more usual motion, the fancy feels a want of connection, a gap or interval, which it cannot fill up, but by supposing {346} some chain of intermediate events to join them. The rich and the great, the proud and the vain will not admit into their gardens an ornament which the meanest of the people can have as well as they. That there was a reasonable approximation is probable from the appearance of later deposits. This may be because of sample reflective essays reading social or racial feeling, or personal uncleanliness or offensiveness, even when the latter is not carried to the point where the librarian can properly object to it. The laughing mood in these cases is understandable as a rioting in newly realised powers, a growing exultation as the consciousness of ability to produce striking effects grows clearer. Gentle and gradual augmentations of the sense of well-being {72} and happiness hardly tend to stir the muscles concerned. The Athenians honestly thought that their country was a democracy, when it was really an oligarchy of the most limited kind. I greatly fear that in most cases of this kind they are beyond his regulation, either because they are congenital or because they are due to habits so ingrained that changing them is impossible. A man would be ridiculous who should appear in public with a suit of clothes quite different from those which are commonly worn, though the new dress should in itself be ever so graceful or convenient. In the older days it merely sat with folded hands, ready to serve. Times tardy? In certain cases, the teasing, as with our own boys, is apt to take on a decidedly rough form. The same illustration, we will say, may be considered by one reader an absolutely necessary part of the book–an organ of its body–while to another it is but an ornamental embellishment–a decorative gewgaw. ‘According to the same law,’ he adds, [What law?] ‘the hamster gathers corn and grain, the dog hides his superfluous food’—[This at any rate seems a rational act.]—‘the falcon kills the hare by driving his beak into its neck,’ &c. In a word, I suspect depth to be that strength, and at the same time subtlety of impression, which will not suffer the slightest indication of thought or feeling to be lost, and gives warning of them, over whatever extent of surface they are diffused, or under whatever disguises of circumstances they lurk. It is miserable, we think, to be deprived of the light of the sun; to be shut out from life and {13} conversation; to be laid in the cold grave, a prey to corruption and the reptiles of the earth; to be no more thought of in this world, but to be obliterated, in a little time, from the affections, and almost from the memory, of their dearest friends and relations. For thee, we will let thee see the bride, she is my daughter, of me, the great chief; she is young; she is beautiful as the lily of the waters; she is straight as the white birch; her eyes are like unto the tears of gum that distil from the trees; she knows how to prepare the meats for the warriors and the sap of the sugar maple; she knows how to knit the fishing nets and keep in order the weapons of war—we will show thee the bride. In every library a stream of money passes in at the desk in very small amounts. But I admit that where chances are so adverse, we may use the word “impossibility” in a rough sense, and so I use it in asserting that it is impossible for persistent “bad luck” to be due to pure chance. But between these two there are many grades of beauty and durability. The way in which little spasms of laughter are apt to intrude themselves into situations which, by making us the object of others’ special attention, bring an awkward consciousness of insecurity, is further illustrated in the behaviour of many boys and girls when summoned to an interview with the Head, in the laughter which often follows the going up to take a prize before a large assembly, and the like. A number of sciences have sprung up in an almost tropical exuberance which undoubtedly excites our admiration, and the garden, not unnaturally, has come to resemble a jungle. What friendship, what generosity, what charity, would prompt us to do with universal approbation, is still more free, and can still less be extorted by force than the duties of gratitude. The eyes which roll in their ample sockets, like two shining orbs, and which are turned away from the spectator, only dart their glances the more powerfully into the soul; and the whole picture is a paragon of frank cordial grace, and transparent brilliancy of colouring. This, therefore, being conceived, it is plain that those waters which are farthest from the moon will have less weight than those of any other part on the same side of the globe, because the moon’s attraction, which conspires with the earth’s attraction, is there least. Does not the librarian in some fashion interpret life and nature to his public, through books in general, even as the writer interprets them through one particular book? If otherwise, we enter into his disapprobation, and condemn it.

This word, therefore, expressing so very abstract and metaphysical an idea, would not easily or readily occur to the first formers of language. Footnote 12: Lavender. Thus, hardly had the ordonnance of prohibition been issued when, in 1260, a knight named Mathieu le Voyer actually brought suit against the king for the loss it inflicted upon him. He pronounces it to be in no sense a legal proof, but only a species of divination, incompatible with every notion of equity and justice; and he prohibits it for the future, except in cases of poisoning or secret murder and treason where other proof is unattainable; and even in these it is placed at the option of the accuser alone; moreover, if the accuser commences by offering proof and fails he cannot then have recourse to combat; the accused must be acquitted.[712] The German Imperial code, known as the Kayser-Recht, which was probably compiled about the same time, contains a similar denunciation of the uncertainty of the duel, but does not venture on a prohibition, merely renouncing all responsibility for it, while recognizing it as a settled custom.[713] In the portion, however, devoted to municipal law, which is probably somewhat later in date, the prohibition is much more stringently expressed, manifesting the influences at work;[714] but even this is contradicted by a passage almost immediately preceding it. Without a knowledge of the spoken language considerably more than rudimentary, it would be hopeless for the student to attempt to solve the enigmas which he meets at every step. In the completion of this vast scheme, he continued to attach the utmost importance to the American languages. The past aorist has two terminations, one in _-na_, and one in _-e_, about the uses and meanings of which we are left sample reflective essays reading equally in the dark. These prudent resolutions taken, his Conversation for some years succeeding is wholly taken up by his Horses, Dogs and Hawks (especially if his Residence be in the Country) and the more sensless Animals that tend ’em. Such is the general character of American languages, and such are the reasons why they should be preserved and studied. These things belong to a museum pure and simple, which is the reason why I am mentioning them at first, to get them out of the way before treating my real subject, which is the debateable ground between library and museum. Agobard, Archbishop of Lyons, attacked the whole system in two powerful treatises, which in many points display a breadth of view and clearness of reasoning far in advance of his age.[1294] Shortly after this we find an echo of these arguments in some utterances of the papacy, such as the disapproval of the lot by Leo IV. No act of Parliament can give knowledge and principle, and good feelings; and no Act should be made as a substitute for knowledge and principle and good feelings, which every one in his specific sphere should possess. The mere want of fortune, mere poverty, excites little compassion. When, for example, in the eleventh month, Ruth sitting on the floor held out her arms to be taken up, and the mother, instead of doing this, stooped and kissed the child, there was a perfect peal of laughter again and again. Much more likely is it that _tlazotla_, to love, is derived directly from the noun _tlazotl_, which means something strung with or fastened to another. In confirmation of this remark, he offered to take down the book, and translate a page any where into his sample reflective essays reading own plain, natural style; and by his doing so, Lord Holland was convinced that he had often missed the thought from having his attention drawn off to the dazzling imagery. Feudalism arose and consolidated its forces on the ruins of the Carlovingian empire without altering the principles upon which the earlier procedures of criminal jurisdiction had been based. The property that the librarian is expected to conserve consists of books–the material in which he works and with which he is expected to produce his effects, and of money and objects–buildings, furniture and utensils–intended to aid him in handling the books properly and in getting them and the users together. If it were not for the wine and the dessert, no author in his senses would accept an invitation to a well-dressed dinner-party, except out of pure good-nature and unwillingness to disoblige by his refusal. M. Surely, we imagine, we can never feel too much for those who have suffered so dreadful a calamity. Thus, some remember trifles, others things of importance. Libraries to-day are doing a thousand things that no one of them would have thought of doing fifty years ago. We may assume that these progressive changes arise, either from the adoption of the products of superior mental capacity appearing in individuals who are members of the community, or from the propagation of ideas, inventions, institutions from one country to another. Callippus, though somewhat younger, the contemporary of Eudoxus, found that even this number was not enough to connect together the vast variety of movements which he discovered in those bodies, and therefore increased it to thirty-four. Another case which occurred at Ledesma, near Salamanca, shows the existence of the belief in Castile.[1160] English colonists brought the superstition across the Atlantic, where it has never been fairly eradicated from the popular mind. In _Every Man in his Humour_ there is a neat, a very neat, comedy of humours. If {2} he believes that the moods of hilarity and the enjoyment of the ludicrous have their rightful place in human experience, he must be ready to challenge the monopoly of wisdom claimed by the out-and-out sticklers for seriousness, and to dispute the proposition that the open, honest laugh connotes either a vulgar taste or a depraved moral nature. Now let me remind you that you are paying for all this service, whether you make use of it or not. The Stoic and the Epicurean alike, widely dissimilar as were their views of the good and their moral tempers, took into seclusion the philosophic life which Aristotle had bidden them combine with a discreet participation in the social life about them; seeking, each in his own manner, to realise its self-sufficiency and its consolations. They would see their country ruined before they would part with the least of their superfluities. He tells us that these beings are supposed to be certain very ancient men who take charge of and guard the towns. The local clergy on questions of religion, and often on others, too; the school principal on history and economics, the organist on music, the village doctor on science–some such men will always be found able and glad to give advice on these subjects or some others; and the place is small indeed that does not include one or two enthusiasts, collectors of insects or minerals or antiquities, who have made themselves little authorities on their pet hobbies and may possibly be the greatest or the only living authorities on those local phases that particularly interest the local librarian. For instance, if I go to a distance where I am anxious to receive an answer to my letters, I am sure to be kept in suspense. Addison did not think it unworthy of his gentle and modest character to set himself at the head of a little cabal of the same kind, in order to keep down the rising reputation of Mr. A few illustrations will aid in impressing these definitions on the mind. The factors here specially referred to which may determine in greater or lesser degree the nature and direction of moral valuation are deliberative, critical and analytic. They seem made of pasteboard, they look like mere machines: their benevolence may be said to go on rollers, and they are screwed to the sticking-place by the wheels and pulleys of humanity: ‘If to their share some splendid virtues fall, Look in their face, and you forget them all.’ They appear so much the creatures of the head and so little of the heart, they are so cold, so lifeless, so mechanical, so much governed by calculation, and so little by impulse, that it seems the toss-up of a halfpenny, a mere turn of a feather, whether such people should become a Granville Sharp, or a Hubert in ‘King John,’ a Howard, or a Sir Hudson Lowe! In the most approved instrumental Music, accordingly, in the overtures of Handel and the concertos of Correlli, there is little or no imitation, and where there is any, it is the source of but a very small part of the merit of those compositions. Neither, therefore, the supposed revolution of the Earth round its own centre, nor that round the Sun, could be natural motions; they must therefore be violent, and consequently could be of no long continuance. But say you, the comparison does not hold in this, that the man _can_ extend his thoughts (and that very wisely too) beyond the present moment, whereas in the other case he cannot move a single step forwards. labour’d Common Place Book; and shall leave Pedants and School-Boys to rake and tumble the Rubbish of Antiquity, and muster all the _Heroes_ and _Heroins_ they can find to furnish matter for some wretched Harangue, or stuff a miserable Declamation with instead of Sense or Argument. The tradition is nothing, or a foolish one. We sympathise less, however, with the pompous and set speeches in the tragedies of Racine and Corneille, or in the serious comedies of Moliere, than we do with the grotesque farces of the latter, with the exaggerated descriptions and humour of Rabelais (whose wit was a madness, a drunkenness), or with the accomplished humanity, the easy style, and gentlemanly and scholar-like sense of Montaigne. There is too wide a gap between the highest monkeys and the human species in this continent.[29] Discoveries of fossil apes might bridge this, but none such has been reported. Thus in his celebrated portrait of Hippolito de Medici, there is a keen, sharpened expression that strikes you, like a blow from the spear that he holds in his hand. To abstain from pleasure too, to curb and restrain our natural passions for enjoyment, which was the office of temperance, could never be desirable for its own sake. I can only say what seems to me an excellent joke seems so to him—there are many jokes neither of us can see the point of: others, we chuckle over, superior persons look down on and would call buffoonery.”[224] One practical reflection to close with.